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Riving Knife

A riving knife is a variation of what most US woodworkers know as a splitter. Its stationary blade of metal or plastic that holds the kerf open behind the blade. This prevents the wood from closing in and pinching the back of the blade and prevents the stock from getting pinched between the blade and the fence, both of which will cause kickback. A riving knife differs from a simple splitter in some... [Read more]

Splitter

A stationary blade of metal or plastic that holds the kerf open behind the blade. This prevents the wood from closing in and pinching the back of the blade and prevents the stock from getting pinched between the blade and the fence, both of which will cause kickback. A more useful variation of the splitter is the riving knife. Riving knives are becoming the norm in the US since as of 2009, Underwriters... [Read more]

Lathe

A tool used to turn blocks of wood into bowls, vessels, pens and various furniture parts and art pieces. #gallery-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode()... [Read more]

Spline

A form of joint reinforcement commonly used in miter joints as well as butt joints. The spline itself is usually a thin piece of wood cut so that the grain runs perpendicular to the joint for ultimate strength. The pieces to be joined each receive a groove that will accept the spline. This is a great way to add strength to a joint that normally lacks it. Its also very useful for alignment purposes... [Read more]

Rift Sawn

Riftsawn lumber is cut with the growth rings anywhere from 30-60 degrees to the face of the board. This produces boards with incredibly “straight” face grain patterns. The boards are also more stable than plain sawn boards but not quite as stable as quarter sawn. Check out this video for a quick rundown of lumber terminology – Video: A Lumbering Feeling #gallery-5 { margin:... [Read more]

Quarter Sawn

Quartersawn lumber has the growth rings of the tree approximately perpendicular to the board’s surface. In general, anything from 60-90 degrees qualifies as “quartersawn”. Quartersawn wood features straight face grain and is considered more stable than plain sawn wood. This lumber is more expensive because of the need for larger trees and the inherently wasteful cutting method.... [Read more]

Flat Sawn

See Plain Sawn  Read More →

Tails

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Through Dovetail

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Sliding Dovetail

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Half-Blind Dovetail

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Plug

Cylindrical piece of wood used to fill a countersunk hole (typically to cover a screw head). Some plugs are meant to be decorative and stand proud of the surface, while others are intended to be sanded flush. A dowel can be used to make plug material, but keep in mind a dowel will show endgrain, while the rest of the board will show face grain, so the plug is more obvious. There are plug cutters... [Read more]

Plain Sawn

Plain sawn (or flat-sawn) lumber has the growth rings of the tree parallel to the board’s broad face. You can usually visualize this by looking at the end grain of the board. Plain sawn wood highlights the grain, loops and growth swirls of the wood and typically features a “cathedral” grain pattern. This is how the vast majority of lumber is cut. Check out this video for a quick... [Read more]

Pitch

A dark, heavy residue/buildup on cutterheads, blades or router bits after milling resinous wood. This adversely affects blade performance and sometimes gives the user the impression that the blade is dull, when in fact it just needs a good cleaning. While some folks opt for aggressive solutions like heavy duty degreaser and oven spray, I prefer letting the item soak in Simple Green or a commercial... [Read more]

Pins

See Dovetail….  Read More →

Pilot Hole

A hole in a workpiece pre-drilled for a nail or screw. The hole is generally small enough to still allow the screw or nail to do its job, but big enough to avoid the wood splitting when the fastener is driven.  Read More →

Pilaster

A vertical rectangular support element that resembles a flat column and projects only slightly from the surface.  Read More →

Outfeed Table

An extra support for a power tool that supports the board after it passes over the bit or blade. Learn how to make an outfeed table with storage – Video: Somebody Feed Me Rockler Table Saw Outfeed TableDesigned to fit most cabinet and contractor style saws. Patented… Rockler Table Saw Outfeed Table  Read More →

Miter Joint

A joint that forms a corner. Usually both sides are beveled at a 45-degree angle so that when the two pieces are joined, they form a 90-degree corner. A very common joint for picture frames, door frames, and molding. Frame Miter Joint  Read More →

Mill

A generic term for processing lumber through the shop (i.e. jointing, planing, ripping, etc).  Read More →

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